Quick FlashBack: Why WordPress Rocks

Ten Reasons (Okay, Eleven) Why WordPress Rocks

It’s been a busy weekend, folks. So, since I originally thought this was running at fellow Liberty States Fiction Writer Nathan Rudy’s blog today–it ran on the first Wed of April instead–I figured I’ll do another catch-up thing and run it here. If you’re here for the first time, welcome and to you this is all new!

So I was hopping through the blogosphere, dealing with some technical blog-post issues when I realized it might do many well —including myself—to sing the praises of WordPress: my blogging software of choice (WP, from here on in).

Disclaimer: I’ve never used another type of blogging software. This article is based solely on my experience with WP and not intended to take away from other brands, if you will.

First, please allow me to credit multi-published author and LSFW secretary Caridad Pineiro for introducing me to WP. Several years ago, this ever-generous-and-amazingly-patient soul gave several hours of her very packed schedule to this ridiculously green newbie writer. Caridad did her best to show me how to create a site and add content that evening. I took notes but may as well have written in Polish, Slavic, Chinese or some other foreign language; I couldn’t make sense of my own notes.

That was in the fall of 2008. Took until the following spring before the ‘a-ha’ moment happened. (I wrote about it on my first post, I was so excited.) I was at least a year into the process before it all started making real sense.

I’ve been blogging with WordPress ever since. Back then, I learned first and foremost: write my posts in a word-processing application then copy and paste into my blogging software. (I’ve lost information and/or changes writing directly into the software. Plus, I have my own draft of the article on my hard drive and/or backed up otherwise. Although WordPress is most likely in no danger of this at all, I’ve read the horror stories of bloggers whose blogging companies shut down and all their posts lost.)

Okay, on to the reasons I’m very happy with WordPress:

(1) Support: (a) “Happiness Engineers” have always gotten back to me via email, usually within 24 hours of my query. Responses have always been helpful and subsequent questions always answered by the same HE; (b) tons of support articles and WordPress TV (video help) available with one click on ‘Help;’ (c) forum of fellow WP bloggers willing to chime in with their experiences on a given topic.

(2) A multitude of free themes designed to meet different blogging needs/likes. One click is all it takes to change the look and feel of your blog, and more custom options (i.e., headers) than I can share about. (This is great for someone like me who gets tired of the same look after a while.)

(3) Inexpensive domains ($24/year), though some folks have described the .me domain as ‘cheesy.’ (I’m still thinking about that one. My website costs a lot more than that to host.)

(4) Newsletter subscriptions of choice: I subscribe to fellow bloggers’ blogs and at least three of WP’s informational blogs. (The latter keep me updated on many things WordPress! J) I also subscribe to The Daily Post, “an experiment in blogging motivation from the folks atWordPress.com.” These lovely folks post blogging ideas and tips to help bloggers get the most out of their blogs. There are also daily and weekly post challenges, photo challenges—you name it. Each is delivered straight to my inbox.

(5) I LOVE this feature: number of comments, likes, etc feature posted at the top of my screen when I’m signed in to WP and reading mine or any other WP blog. Clicking on this lovely little number at the top shows me who “liked” and/or commented on my post. Best of all: this same feature shows responses to my comments at other WP blogs; this means I don’t have to remember where I commented in the event there was a response! Cool, right?

(6) Also at the top of my screen: access to a new post screen on the very WP site I’m visiting. If I’m inspired to write a post of my own, I don’t have to leave the article that inspired me! (For those of us who have the focus of a flea, this is a godsend. J)

(7) My favorite: Reblogging: An awesome feature recently re-introduced (and very similar to the PressThis! share button at the bottom of my post.

Here’s how it works:

I’m at someone’s blog and read an article that totally speaks to me. I hit reblog. I get the option of writing a little intro before hitting send. Now that write-up becomes my next post and is instantly delivered to my followers’ inbox as well. Easy-peasy promo for the fellow blogger and instant content for mine. Awesome, yes? (And on that note, check out the WordPress landing page. Freshly Pressed offers a page of thumbnails to a variety of blogs. Promo from the WP folks themselves to help get your name out there and drive traffic to your site. Ask social media maven Kristen Lamb what making Freshly Pressed did for her blog! Not sure what it takes to get picked but I’m hoping to get there one of these days!)

(8) Simple importing/exporting of content: more on that here.

(9) Maybe it’s coincidence, but seems like many of those making a name for themselves in the writing world (i.e., Kristen Lamb, Sean Platt, etc) recommend using WordPress. Honestly, I’ve yet to read different.

(10) This is the newest reason: badges for celebrating milestones. Cool and fun!

(11) Way more features, incentives and ideas that I’m by no means aware exist. BUT: go to WordPress.com and start looking around. Promise you’ll come across something that meets your needs.

So, there you have it. MHO of why WordPress is the way to go if you’re looking to start a blog or switch from the software you’re currently using. Now, the audience participation part: assuming you’re a blogger too, which software do you use? Are you happy with it? Why or why not? And as a blog reader, do you notice any difference between blogs hosted by different companies?

Again, I thank you, Nathan, for having me here! For those of you who liked what you read, won’t you please take a moment and help spread this content into cyberspace by clicking one of the share buttons below? Thanks for taking the time to read!

My thoughts on a great, romantic weekend read on Friday. Hope you stop in!

Have a wonderful day!

Joanna

Jenn Nixon can be WILD AND WICKED!

Getting a seriously late-in-the-day start friends, but happy Friday and upcoming weekend just the same. I am SO looking forward to the BNP Paribas Tennis Championships starting tomorrow. I need something to tide me over until the French Open late in May!

Just finished reading fellow Liberty States Fiction Writer Jenn Nixon’s WILD AND WICKED:  Quick, short read, a very fun ride and so NOT LACKING in heat and perfect for getting you through the weekend. (Please note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my thoughts on it.)

In a nutshell, Veronica Chance, goes undercover as a waitress at a “gentlemen’s club.” She is in search of her sister, who appears to have gone missing. On her first night at work, she winds up providing a mini lap dance to none other than the country’s most sought after detective, Mason Storm. Each immediately realizes the chemistry between them. Mason quickly picks up on Veronica being in such a place for more than cash. Veronica senses the ‘good guy’ in Mason. As the night winds down Mason has his first opportunity to play hero and rescues Veronica when he realizes she was drugged at an after-party where hedonism runs rampant, women are used and possibly being trafficked. Mason is also impressed with Veronica’s smarts; most especially how much she’s learned—in one night— about a case he’s been working on for two years. They agree to team up.

The rest you’ll have to read for yourself.

I have to say, author Jenn Nixon packed a whole lot of story into 48 short pages. She had me hooked on Mason by the end of his first scene. (I’m such a sucker for the hero who picks up on the damsel in distress.) Veronica is self-assured, smart, witty and just…happening. Well written, fast-paced; packed with chemistry, humor, vivid language and popping scenes on all levels, WILD AND WICKED did not disappoint. (I take that back. It did too disappoint. It ended. But: CHANCE OF A STORM, the sequel, is available. I’ll be reading–and most likely providing my take on it too!) Read more about all of Jenn’s books at her website!

About the author: Jenn Nixon was born, raised, and still resides in New Jersey . She is a member of Romance Writers of America and Liberty States Fiction Writers. An active blogger and social media participant, Jenn likes to stay on top of what’s hot and popular around the world whether it’s TV, books, movies, or politics.

Like what you read? Please take a second to click a share button or two. You’ll not only be doing me a service, you’ll be promoting Jenn’s work as well! We both thank you!

Have a great weekend and enjoy all your weekend reads!

Joanna

May Abundance Find You…

On Valentine’s Day! What better way to show love than starting with oneself? Best insurance for sharing this simple yet oh-so-powerful emotion –or for paying it forward!

So direct from my inbox to you I bring author, life coach and proponent of positive parenting Diane Lang. Here are her tips on living life to its most abundant!

          

According to Diane:

We make life harder then it needs to be. There are so many simple things we can do in our everyday life that would make our lives fuller and richer. We could live a positive lifestyle, it’s a realistic goal. Below I will list many simple ways to add happiness into your daily lifestyle. Make each of these simple things part of your daily lifestyle and see/feel the changes….. It’s easier then you think

 1. See the glass half full not half empty – change your perspective/view and the world changes with you

2. Wake up each day with a “Gratitude check” – take the first few minutes of each day to appreciate all the good in your life. Each day remember you woke up, you could see the sun shinning, you have a roof over your head, food to eat, water to drink, air to breathe, friends to talk to and much more.. There is always something to be grateful for, it’s just reminding yourself of it.

3. Flow – each day try to do an activity that you love that life just flows for that time. It could be ten minutes or a few hours but just make sure to add flow into your daily life. 

4. Make sure your basic needs are met – did you drink 8-10 glasses of water each day ( not tea, coffee or soda), did you get at least 7-8 hours of sleep, did you eat healthy, exercise, etc. Our cognitive abilities and state of mind depends on our basic needs being met. Make your health a priority.

5. Did you show love today – did you give a hug, a kiss, hold someone’s hand, pat then on the shoulder. If not, then go give a hug ASAP!

6. Thank you – always say thank you to anyone and everyone who deserves it. Also, remember to say Sorry if it’s needed as well. Keep open lines of communication. 

7. Be an active listener – no interruptions, be patient and let the person speak, really listen and pause before answering, summarize what they said and ask questions if needed.

8. Be an empathic listener – imagine how the other person is feeling. Put yourself in their shoes.

9. Have a Career not a job – do what you love. 

10. Smile, laugh – all are contagious – spread the joy.

11. Step outside your comfort zone today – take a small risk each and everyday.

12. Add variety to your day even small things like taking a new route to work, trying a new food or drink will bring bursts of happiness. 

13.  Learn – each and everyday did you learn something new? This can be informal learning through discussions, movies, newspapers, current events etc. 

14. Stay in touch with your friends and family.

15. Visualize your dreams each and every day. If you can’t see it, you will have trouble reaching it.

16. Take a vacation – refuel and refresh, you will be more productive and creative in both your personal and professional life. 

17. Be a great role model – your kids will follow in your shoes.

18. Pay it forward – random acts of kindness each and every day.

19. Perseverance – never give up. 

20. Be self-aware – know yourself. 

21. Less TV, Cell phones, Internet, Video Games, Social media and more face to face time with loved ones. reconnect with loved ones in person. 

22. Forgiveness – forgive for you so you can move forward with your life. Forgive for you not anyone else!

23. The past has some great teachable moments but don’t live in the past. 

24. Live in the moment. 

25. Plan for the future. 

26. Work on what you CAN control in your life. If you can’t control it, let it go.

27. Always ask for help if you need it.

As always, Diane, excellent reminders for me! (I love 18, 19 and 26.) For those of you in the areas below, try to get to one of Diane’s workshops. Always worth the time!

Workshops:

Thursday, Feb 16th at 11am – Positivity in the Workplace
Women’s Opportunity center of Burlington County, NJ
Thursday, February 23 at 6:30 pm – Positive Parent
Mt Olive Adult school, NJ
973-691-0900 ext 7264
Monday, February 27 at 6:30 pm – Living your best life
MT Olive Adult school, NJ
973-691-0900 ext 7264
Monday, March 1 at 7pm – Dealing with unemployed stress
New Canaan, CT – CATS Group
For more information on Diane Lang visit her website at www.dlcounseling.com
Thanks for stopping in, have a wonderful day and catch you all later this week!
Joanna

Just Video Games or A Social Network?

Good day, everyone!

Since we talked about Christmas on Tuesday, let’s finish this week’s blog-set with one related to the same holiday. Then, we’ll put Christmas to rest—until after Thanksgiving (or maybe July ;)).

My 13-year-old son must have revised his 2011 Christmas list six times (and not for editing purposes, I can assure you.) Can’t tell you how many times I told him this particular holiday isn’t “mail order.” Kids, however, will be kids and this one was true to form.

He waxed and waned between a new gaming system (PS-3) and several other pricey game-related items (for X-box 360, which he has). He finally settled on the former as he handed over the final draft of his list.

       https://gustavus.edu/gts/Xbox_360

When hubby and I got to the gaming store and looked over the list, I noticed at least one-third of the PS-3 items he wanted he’d recently acquired for X-box, at the tune of $150-200. Seriously? After I asked the young guy behind the counter some questions why one system would be favorable over another, a judgment call was definitely in order. We picked up games and acc  essories for his X-Box 360 that were on his list as back-up, plus some other goodies Mom thought he could use: a robe, NY Giants’ hoodie—you know, essentials. ;)

   http://us.playstation.com/ps3/

FYI: The big draw for PS-3 is said to be free online gaming, but Sony had been hacked earlier that year and was down for three months. X-box 360 requires X-box Points to play online and must be purchased separately, at the tune of roughly $8/month or $60/year, a significant savings if you’re willing to put the bigger cost up front. (BTW, video games are no longer an individual activity. Kids play online with each other, within the online framework of the gaming system they have. They invite each other to virtual “parties” or play football games against each other, work as teams on other games, etc.)

Most of my son’s friends have X-Box 360; the system, so far, seems to have the staying power of Windows XP. In other words, it’s been around and most likely will remain popular a while longer. (Dang! When did I learn all this stuff? I hated computers when they first arrived on the scene. Hubby bought me my first one, lol. )

Fast-forward to Christmas morning: To say I had a very disappointed child on my hands is an understatement. Folks, we had DRAMA, and all that talk about the real meaning of Christmas, expectations, mail order, etc wasn’t going anywhere. (Thank goodness our visit to church changed his mood, as did having Christmas at our house.)

Of course I questioned the choices hubby and I made as a different aspect of the potential problem hit me: Were we cutting our son off from the social network his games provide by not having gotten the new system? I decided to delve further by asking my son some questions. Turns out, only one friend got PS-3 and plays X-Box along with the other “core crowd” of gaming buddies. (Sounds like I’m not the only parent who thinks this way.)

I’m grateful to report things worked out. (Somehow they always do.) By evening, after the festivities wound down, my son came to me and said, “I feel like a fool about the way I acted this morning.” (And, he was glad he didn’t get the PS-3; the next day, he stood in line for at least thirty minutes and came home with an I-phone, which he bought with his Christmas money. He did need a new communication device). Even as I wrote this, he rethought his behavior and vocalized his feelings on having missed looking forward to opening gifts because of his attitude. I found it especially saddening on Christmas day to know how upset he was. Besides it being every kid’s favorite holiday, this same child pretty much decorated the house and did all the wrapping (save his and his brother’s presents; momma handled those). He brought the festive look to our home and saved me tons of work. But, if he learned something from the experience that will stick with him, then I suppose the rough start to the biggest day of the year was worth it.

One more notice: He recently played on a friend’s PS-3 and decided he didn’t like it after all. Then he started talking about what he wants for Christmas 2012. (That’s when the hand went up—I was, after all, watching the NY Giants’ Wild Card game and was in no position to consider the next holiday season, lol.)

So what are your takes on this subject? Have you ever had to make that call that you know would so disappoint someone? What did you do? How did the situation turn out?

Have a wonderful weekend–it’s an extended one for us–and ttys! Go Giants (and Packers)!

Joanna

Worth the Time: Awesome Blog Reads

Happy Friday, writers, readers and friends! Are you geared up for fall with October in full force? (I’m still working on getting my fall decor out. A year just flies!)

Keeping things simple today and sharing some of the great posts I happened across this week and last. (As always, I’m catching up.) Hope any and/or all of these posts speak to you as they did to me. And if you liked what you read, take a moment and click a share button (where applicable) or give a shout-out at one of your own social media platforms. I promise, that blog author will be nothing but grateful! Finally, if you comment here on what you liked, I’ll do my best to find more of the same or related posts.

Here goes:

Mash-up articles for Friday: 10/07

Meredith Bell: What Do You Have a Knack For?

Scott Hunter’s Blog: The Pathway to Effectiveness

Scott Hunter’s Blog: The Real Meaning of Cause and Effect

Because this is so appropriate for a Friday: YA Author Julie Musil’s Friday Night Rewind

Real-life Romance finds its way into Jane Richardson’s Edinburgh Fog

For those wanting to go it alone in the self-pub world: Keeping up with e-book technology by Jenn Talty

Jami Gold answers this very valid question: So Why Do Guest Posts?

Merry Farmer sings the Praises of the Unlikely Hero

Looking to guest post? Jon Konrath may want your write up!

Christine Warner: Reasons to Slow Down (Just a Little Bit)

Why Read Bad Fiction? Mark Landen has a few good reasons!

Feel free to add any of your own. Have a great weekend!

Joanna

Two Quick Things (Including a winner!)

Happy Saturday everyone! Tired of clouds outside and hoping the sun makes its way through and has its way for more than a few hours.

1. Yesterday, I posted in WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge and let all of you know I’m hoping to do so on a regular basis. FORGOT to ask you all to give me a hand at getting my blog more visibility by taking a minute to show some love and comment on any photos I post!

2. Winner! Winner! Winner! Christine Warner left a comment and gets her choice of a critique or a digital copy of No Matter Why! (Thanks so much to all of you who took the time to comment.)

I’ll be posting Monday and Wednesday (and photo) Friday of next week!

Thanks so much and see y’all then,

Joanna

Potential Power of Twitter–Part 2

Good day, friends!

Last time I shared a story about the time some friends and I wound up lost while driving to a women’s retreat. (You can read that post here.) Today I’ll tie that into:

The Incredible, Potential Power of Twitter

Yes, I wrote that title—and mean it. Would never have happened a year ago, I promise. I couldn’t be bothered being a part of this monster of a social media tool, nor did I have any desire to learn about it so that I could be. Then I happened on Kristen Lamb’s blog. Then I cracked and bought her bestseller, We Are Not Alone: The Writer’s Guide to Social Media—WANA, from here on and the best $4.99 I’ve spent in some time. Read my thoughts on it here. Those thoughts got me a request to write a short article for Author-Me’s monthly newsletter

Knock-knock: Are you starting to get an idea of how this works?

These days you’ll find me hanging out here, on Facebook and yes, Twitter. Do I absolutely love any of Kristen’s recommended three? Not necessarily, but I love people and enjoy making online friends and connections and learning more than I ever imagined I could via all the blogs I find via the three venues. (Kristen’s weekly mash-up of awesomeness—a.k.a. blogs—could keep me reading all day, and since January of this year, I swear I’ve gained an education in social media and self-publishing from blogs alone. And all for the cost of what? Internet access and whatever time I’m willing to put into it.)

Sorry. Sidetracked. Back to business!

So what sets Twitter apart? Doesn’t take that much time as a tweeter to figure out how powerful a tool this is. I will, however, state it’s much easier to see the potential once you’re using Tweetdeck, Hootsuite or similar personal browser created to organize and manage the hundreds and probably thousands of tweets headed your way alone on a daily basis. (Depends on your following as well as your ability to create/maintain online relationships. Oh, and don’t expect to be able to read and/or respond to every message once you’re ‘established.’ Twitter interactions happen pretty much in a ‘real time’ manner: about ninety minutes (assuming you’re using a personal browser and based on how busy a particular column is—more about this later) before you ‘missed’ a tweet, or more realistically, a slew of them.

Okay, writing about this is getting bigger than I can handle, so I’ll stick to what, IMHO, are the keys to what makes Twitter so amazing: simplicity and inherent exponential potential.

Simplicity: One-hundred-forty characters to get a thought across AND get it onto the screens of x-number of fellow tweeps. At first I thought, what’s the point of just that tiny window? Now I realize a side benefit: teaching me to edit and keep what I say succinct and direct. (Only the most important words here.)

Inherent exponential potential: Concept=simple. Potential power: beyond believable and in need of a few sentences to do it justice. When you tweet, write your message but spare some characters. You’ll use those spaces to create a hashtag: the pound sign/symbol (#) followed by pretty much any word you want. Think in terms of tags or keywords.

Example: If I’m tweeting about US Open tennis, I’ll add #usopen, #tennis, #rafaelnadal or something along those lines. The Twitter monster makes sure that anyone who has a Tweetdeck column dedicated to any or all of those (or similar) hashtags will see my tweet. Now do you get an idea of how many potential people you can reach with only one-hundred-forty characters? (And that doesn’t include retweets, folks—messages you ‘repeat’ to all your followers with a single click.) Honestly, I am boggled—better yet: flum-gubbered—every time I think about this.

I’ll stop here—think I overwhelmed myself—before I give you too much to take in. (Something tells me I’ll be exploring this topic again.) Please feel free to shoot out questions: here, or at my Facebook and/or Twitter pages.

Don’t forget: A critique of up to 10 pages of your work-in-progress or completed manuscript is still up for grabs at the end of this week. Leave a comment for your chance to win!

Until next time,

Joanna

Potential Power of Twitter–Part 1

“Joanna, you have a story for everything!”

Those of you who know me or have been around my blog-block before have already heard/read that quote: what a former co-worker told me years ago, way before I had any clue I’d be a writer. She was right. No matter the topic, I had some related account of a cousin, television show or life experience of my own. (I was new to the work-force then. Imagine how many more stories I have now! :D)

These days my kids and their friends roll their eyes and look at each other when they make some random comment then realize they just triggered my retelling of: “Another story.”

Oh, God. She’s about to do it again…Hang in there: I’m going somewhere with this. (Pinky swear…)

And yes, I changed the names in the interest of privacy!

Years ago I attended a women’s retreat. The drive should have taken about three hours from start to finish. I drove, accompanied by two women. Sally was at least twenty years older than I; Melanie might have been ten years younger (and a bit of a nervous type).

With written directions and my cell phone in hand (okay it was a dino-phone), we took off on the interstate, excited to be away from everyone for a couple of days. We took exit #13—just like the paper said—and wound up spending the next three hours seriously lost. (All we knew was we were in God’s country—somewhere—with not much more to go on but trees and two-lane roads. We later learned the directions didn’t specify we were supposed to take exit #13 AFTER we crossed over into the next state—kind of an important detail…).

Cell-phone reception wasn’t what it is today, so my dino-phone was pretty useless. We happened on at least one hotel and asked for directions. Those turned out as helpful as the phone. Sally and I found much humor in the situation; figured we’d get there eventually. Melanie later told us she was flipping out in the back seat while Sally and I just laughed. (We had no idea how upset with us she was until the next day, when she finally told us.)

We had plenty of gas and a sturdy vehicle; no need to panic. We weren’t however, any closer to where we needed to be, nor did we have a clue how to get there. We stopped for directions again. And again. And probably a time after that. Every time we realized we were lost—again!—Sally and I laughed. Melanie got more anxious.

We finally made it to some town and stopped a man who happened to be walking by. I don’t remember exactly what he said, but when he opened his sentence exactly the same way as had so many of those we asked for directions before him, Sally and I looked at each other and fell apart laughing. We couldn’t stop.

Once Sally and I could talk, we apologized and explained why we cracked up the way we did; in no way did we intend any offense. He assured us none was taken. “I have a son with schizophrenia. Nothing you can say can upset me. I’ll get you where you need to go.”

We promised to pray for him and his son.

Don’t you know? That man’s directions got us to our destination, six hours after we started out.

The following Sunday, the women who’d gone on the retreat were called to share some of their experiences relative to the previous weekend. Sally, Melanie and I shared out ‘lost’ story, enjoying very much the collective chuckles of the congregation as we did so.

Then we mentioned the man who finally put us on the correct road to our destination, his son and our promise to pray for them and their family.

As a church we prayed together. Then I thought about how individuals might go home and pray for them too, and how they might ask someone else to pray, and those folks might ask someone else to pray, and so on and so on—until more people than any of us could imagine are praying for this gentleman and his schizophrenic son. For all any of us knows, people could still remember him or the story and be praying for him today. My retelling of this story serves as a reminder to do so for me and may incline others to do so as well.

And somehow, all of brings to mind the incredible, potential power of Twitter.

Just a reminder: A critique of up to 10 pages of your work-in-progress or completed manuscript is still up for grabs at the end of this week. Leave a comment for your chance to win!

More next time, as in Wednesday. ;)

See you then!

Joanna

An Invitation to Writers and Authors: Every Stage of the Journey

For anyone and everyone willing to trek out to North-Central New Jersey for a ‘magical day’:

Liberty States Fiction Writers present the 2011 Create Something Magical Conference!

When: March 19, 2011

Where: Renaissance Woodbridge Hotel, Iselin, New Jersey, 515 Route 1 South & Gill Lane, Iselin, New Jersey 08830

Phone: 732-634-3600 Fax: 732-634-0258

Featuring:

Keynote Speaker Mary Janice Davidson, New York Times and USA Today best-selling and prolific writer who is published primarily in paranormal romance but also fantasy and non-fiction.

Plus an exciting line-up of speakers and workshops to help hone and polish your writing:

Cathy Maxwell:  Voice–

Your Writing Personality?

Jonathan Maberry:  Going Pro: Becoming a Professional Writer

Mary Burton:  Writing Mysteries

Virginia Kantra: Dialogue

Angela James: Managing Your Author Brand

Sarah Wendell: Blogging

Debra Mullins: Creating Complicated Characters

Judi McCoy: Five Must Do Steps to Self Editing

Treva Harte & Diane Whiteside: NY Publishers vs. ePublishers: What Do They Want

Lisa Verge Higgins: It’s All About Emotional Intimacy: Working With Point of View

Judi Fennell: Novel in a Nutshell

Stephanie Julian:    Over the Plate Pitches

Melinda Leigh & KM Fawcett: Martial Arts & Writing Action

Tracey Lyons: Gone Fishing: How to Catch an Agent

Jenni Holbrook: Writing Synopsis

Keri Mikulski, Alison Formento, and Jennifer Hubbard: Writing Children’s Books and YA Novels

Our conference will offer a new feature this year, video pitches with Kevan Lyon of Marsal Lyon Literary Agency has graciously agreed to take appointments via webcam.

Other agents also attending:

Louise Fury, L. Perkins Agency

Marisa Corvisiero, L. Perkins Agency

Lois Winston,  Ashley Grayson Agency

Mary Sue Seymour., The Seymour Agency

Nalini Akolekar, Spencerhill Associates

Kevan Lyon, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency

*****Editors who are attending to hear pitches from Conference Attendees:****

Wendy Lee, Avon/Harpercollins

Angela James, Carina Press

Latoya Smith, Grand Central Publishing

Renee Rocco, Lyrical Press

Heather Osborn, Samhain Publishing

Raelene Gorlinsky, Ellora’s Cave Publishing

Treva Harte, Loose-Id

Stephanie Murray, Crescent Moon Press

Marlene Castricato, Crescent Moon Press

Kathy Cottrell, The Wild Rose Press

Holly Schmidt, Ravenous Romance

Karen Syed, Echelon Press

Editors from    Harlequin Enterprises, namely:

Elizabeth Mazer, Assistant Editor, Love Inspired/Silhouette

Stacy Boyd, Senior Editor, Desire

Keyren Gerlach, Associate Editor, Romantic Suspense

Susan Litman, Editor, Special Edition

Shana Smith, Assistant Editor, Desire/Romantic Suspense

Also included in the conference are gift basket giveaways, lunch, a networking reception, and a multi-author book signing. The book signing is open to the public.

****Registration ends March 1.****

Registration:  Liberty States Fiction Writers Members $110, Non-Members $130, Conference with Membership or renewal $145

Please visit Liberty States Fiction Writers for more details and to register online!

The Liberty States Fiction Writers welcome pre-published writers at all levels as well as e-published, small press and traditionally published authors.

FYI from Joanna: This class-act conference really is a great day: fun, exciting, informative and a great opportunity to network and hob-knob with other folks who ‘get’ what we writer-people are all about!

Have a great day, everyone! Thanks!

Joanna